First EU citizens using ePrescriptions in other EU country

Source: European Union

The initiative applies to all ePrescriptions prescribed in Finland and to the Estonian pharmacies that have signed the agreement. The novelty of this initiative is that the ePrescriptions are visible electronically to participating pharmacists in the receiving country via the new eHealth Digital Service Infrastructure, without the patient having to provide a written prescription. This is in line with our policy on Digital Health and Care, which aims to empower patients by giving access to their health data and ensuring continuity of care.
Andrus Ansip, Vice President for the Digital Single Market, said: “Congratulations to Finland and Estonia for showing the path in eHealth cooperation between states and I would like other countries to follow soon. People should be able to use their e-prescriptions across borders. Free movement is a founding principle of the EU: we must make it as easy as possible for people to get treatment or medicines when abroad in the EU. The next major step will be to simplify patient access to their very own health data, by developing a common format for exchanging electronic health records between EU countries.”
Vytenis Andriukaitis, Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, said: “I very much welcome the first step in the exchange of ePrescriptions between Finland and Estonia. Sharing ePrescriptions and Patient Summaries will be crucial for patient safety as it can help doctors to better understand a foreign patient’s medical history and can reduce the risks of incorrect medication and the costs of duplicate tests.The Commission will continue its support to expand these exchanges across the EU.”
Mariya Gabriel,Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, said: “This is a great starting point for better care for citizens, something arguably very important for them. ePrescriptions and International Patient Summaries can save lives in case of emergency situations. The EU Budget financed the technical solutions used for these exchanges, showing once again how important and how close it is to citizen’s daily life.”
In 2011, the European institutions adopted Directive 2011/24 which ensures continuity of care for European citizens across borders. The directive gives the possibility for Member States to exchange health data in a secure, efficient and interoperable way. The following cross-border health services are now being progressively introduced in all EU Member States:
1) ePrescription and eDispensation allow any EU citizen to retrieve his/her medication in a pharmacy located in another EU Member State, thanks to the electronic transfer of their prescription from his/her country of residence to the country of travel. The country of residence is then informed about the retrieved medicine in the visited country;
2) Patient Summaries provide background information on important health-related aspects such as allergies, current medication, previous illness, surgeries, etc., making it digitally accessible in case of a medical (emergency) visit in another country. It is an abstract of a larger collection of health data called the European Health Record. To make this a reality, the Commission will soon be presenting a Recommendation on the European Electronic Health Record Exchange Format.
Data protection rules are strictly observed and patients will have to provide their consent before these services are accessed.
Both services were made possible thanks to the eHealth Digital Service Infrastructure which connects the eHealth national services, allowing them to exchange health data, and which is funded by the European Commission’s Connecting Europe Facility.
Next steps
22 Member States are part of the eHealth Digital Service Infrastructure and are expected to exchange ePrescriptions and Patient Summaries by the end of 2021. 10 Member States (Finland, Estonia, Czechia, Luxembourg, Portugal, Croatia, Malta, Cyprus, Greece and Belgium) may start these exchanges by the end of 2019.
The eHealth Network (the body of eHealth authorities in the EU) has recently given the green light to Finland and Estonia to start exchanging ePrescriptions and to Czechia and Luxembourg to receive Patient Summaries of foreign citizens.
More information:
More information can be found here

Follow us on Twitter: @Ansip_EU @V_Andriukaitis @GabrielMariya @EU_Health

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ASEAN: Council adopts conclusions

Source: European Union

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Chemical weapons: the EU places nine persons and one entity under new sanctions regime

Source: European Union

Your request will be handled by the Press Office of the General Secretariat of the Council in accordance with the provisions of Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Community institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data.
Your data will be stored in the database until you unsubscribe from the service.
Certain data (name, e-mail address, preferred language, media name, media type) may be disclosed to the press offices of the European institutions, the Permanent Representations of the Member States and to European Union agencies, under the conditions laid down in Articles 7 and 8 of Regulation 45/2001.
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Syria: EU adds eleven businessmen and five entities to sanctions list

Source: European Union

. These businessmen and companies are involved in luxury estate development and other regime-backed projects, and as such support and/or benefit from the Syrian regime.
The sanctions list now includes 270 persons and 72 entities targeted by a travel ban and an asset freeze. EU sanctions currently in place against Syria also include an oil embargo, restrictions on certain investments, a freeze of the assets of the Syrian central bank held in the EU, and export restrictions on equipment and technology that might be used for internal repression as well as on equipment and technology for the monitoring or interception of internet or telephone communications. The sanctions on Syria were originally imposed in 2011. They are reviewed on an annual basis, the next review being due by 1st June.
The EU remains committed to finding a lasting and credible political solution to the conflict in Syria as defined in the UN Security Council resolution 2254 and in the 2012 Geneva Communiqué. As stated in the EU strategy on Syria adopted in April 2017, as reaffirmed in the Council conclusions of 16 April 2018, the EU believes that there can be no military solution to the conflict and strongly supports the work of the UN Special Envoy and the intra-Syrian talks in Geneva.
The legal acts, including the names of the persons and entities concerned, are available in the EU Official Journal.
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EU Daily News 21 / 01 / 2019

Source: European Union

The Juncker Plan supports chronic disease prevention in Finland
The Investment Plan for Europe, or Juncker Plan, is backing a €20 million European Investment Bank (EIB) loan to Finnish company Nightingale Health. The company will use the financing to further develop its blood analysis technology, which facilitates the detection and prevention of chronic diseases. Vice-President Jyrki Katainen, responsible for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness, who attended the signature event in Helsinki, said: “Europe invests heavily in education and science as we believe that putting a strategic effort into these areas can reap huge benefits. This commitment has resulted in Europe’s position today as a world leader in cutting edge medical research. We are delighted that the Investment Plan for Europe is fostering the development of Nightingale’s technology which has the potential to add significant value to European healthcare.” Nightingale’s innovative blood analysis technology can detect early signs of chronic diseases, improving for example the assessment of a person’s future risk of developing heart disease or type 2 diabetes. A press release is available here. As of December 2018, the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI), at the heart of the Juncker Plan, had already mobilised €371.2 billion of additional investments, including €7.8 billion in Finland. (For more information: Annika Breidthardt – Tel.: .: +32 229 56169)
 
Eurogroup and ECOFIN meetings, 21 and 22 January 2019
Vice-President Dombrovskis and Commissioner Moscovici will represent the Commission at today’s Eurogroup meeting. The Eurogroup will discuss the Commission’s Recommendation on the economic policy of the euro area for 2019, issued in November 2018 in the context of the European Semester. It will discuss the international role of the euro on the basis of the Commission’s Communication from December 2018. The ministers will also launch the process to appoint a new member of the European Central Bank’s Executive Board to replace Peter Praet, whose term ends on 31 May 2019. The Eurogroup will then continue in an inclusive format to followup on the December 2018 Euro Summit and discuss the state of play of the ongoing work on the deepening of the Economic and Monetary Union. Commissioner Moscovici will participate in the press conference following the meeting. At tomorrow’s ECOFIN meeting, Vice-President Dombrovskis and Commissioner Moscovici will represent the Commission. The Council will discuss the InvestEU programme, the Commission’s proposal to boost private and public investment in Europe in the next long-term EU budget, building on the success of the Juncker Plan. Ministers will then exchange views on the review of the European system of financial supervision, focusing in particular on the way forward on the Commission proposals to improve the mandates, governance and funding of the three European supervisory authorities (ESAs) and the proposed additional measures to strengthen supervision in the area of anti-money laundering. A press conference with Vice-President Dombrovskis will follow the meeting. (For more information: Annika Breidthardt – Tel.: +32 229-56153; Johannes Bahrke – Tel.: +32 229 58615; Sophie Dupin de Saint-Cyr – Tel.: +32 229 56169; Letizia Lupini – Tel.: +32 229 51958)

First EU citizens using ePrescriptions in other EU country
Today, the first EU patients can use digital prescriptions issued by their home doctor when visiting a pharmacy in another EU country: Finnish patients are now able to go to a pharmacy in Estonia and retrieve medicine prescribed electronically by their doctor in Finland. The initiative applies to all ePrescriptions prescribed in Finland and to the Estonian pharmacies that have signed the agreement. The novelty of this initiative is that the ePrescriptions are visible electronically to participating pharmacists in the receiving country via the new eHealth Digital Service Infrastructure, without the patient having to provide a written prescription. This is in line with our policy on Digital Health and Care, which aims to empower patients by giving access to their health data and ensuring continuity of care. Andrus Ansip, Vice-President for the Digital Single Market, Vytenis Andriukaitis, Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, and Mariya Gabriel,Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, have welcomed this the first step in the exchange of ePrescriptions between Finland and Estonia, which paves the way for eHealth cooperation between states and is a great starting point for better care for our citizens. A press release is available in EN, FR, DE, FI, SVandET. (For more information: Anca Paduraru – Tel: +32 229 91269; Nathalie Vandystadt – Tel.: +32 229 67083; Aikaterini Apostola – Tel.: +32 229 87624; Marietta Grammenou – Tel.: +32 229 83583)

The EU makes proposals to advance the UN reform process of international investment-related disputes
The EU and its Member States submitted last Friday two proposals to the UN Working Group under the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) tasked with examining reform of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS). The proposals by the EU and its Member States, as well as proposals submitted by other countries, will be discussed at the next meeting of the Working Group from 1 to 5 April 2019 that has been convening since November 2017. The first EU paper sets out the EU’s proposal of establishing a permanent multilateral investment court with an appeal mechanism and full-time adjudicators. The EU views this as the only reform option that can effectively respond to all the concerns identified in this UN process. It would enhance the predictability and consistency of decisions and ensure their correctness, eliminate the ethical concerns of the current system, and effectively address the problems of excessive costs and duration. The second paper makes proposals for an effective work plan so that the Working Group develops concrete solutions and text proposals to be adopted by the UNCITRAL Commission and ultimately the UN General Assembly. The reports of the meetings of the Working Group are available on the UNCITRAL website. (For more information: Daniel Rosario – Tel.: +32 229 56185; Kinga Malinowska – Tel: +32 229 51383)
 
State aid: Commission finds sale of Austria’s 25% shareholding in Hypo Steiermark to Raiffeisen-Landesbank Steiermark involves no State aid
The European Commission has found that the sale by the Austrian State of the 25% plus 2 shares it holds in Landeshypothekenbank Steiermark AG (“Hypo Steiermark”) to private bank Raiffeisen-Landesbank Steiermark AG does not involve State aid within the meaning of EU rules. Raiffeisen-Landesbank Steiermark already holds 75% minus 2 shares of Landeshypothekenbank Steiermark and has a pre-emption right to buy the remaining shares. Austria notified the sale to the Commission and submitted valuations of the Hypo Steiermark shares by two independent experts. On this basis and on the basis of further information submitted by Austria, the Commission concluded that the sale price was in line with market conditions. The transaction therefore does not involve any State aid within the meaning of EU rules. More information will be available on the Commission’s competition website, in the public case register, under the case number SA.51650 once any confidentiality issues have been resolved. (For more information: Ricardo Cardoso – Tel.: +32 229 80100; Giulia Astuti – Tel.: +32 229 55344)

Eurostat: La dette publique en baisse à 86,1% du PIB dans la zone euro, en baisse à 80,8% du PIB dans l’UE28 (Troisième trimestre 2018 par rapport au deuxième trimestre 2018)
À la fin du troisième trimestre 2018, le ratio de la dette publique par rapport au PIB s’est établi à 86,1% dans la zone euro (ZE19), contre 86,3% à la fin du deuxième trimestre 2018. Dans l’UE28, le ratio a diminué, passant de 81,0% à 80,8%. Par rapport au troisième trimestre 2017, le ratio de la dette publique par rapport au PIB a baissé tant dans la zone euro (de 88,2% à 86,1%) que dans l’UE28 (de 82,5% à 80,8%). À la fin du troisième trimestre 2018, les titres de créances ont représenté 81,2% de la dette publique de la zone euro et 82,0% de celle de l’UE28, les crédits respectivement 15,7% et 13,8%, et le numéraire et dépôts 3,1% et 4,2%. En raison de l’implication des gouvernements de l’UE dans l’aide financière à certains États membres, des données trimestrielles sur les prêts intergouvernementaux sont également publiées. À la fin du troisième trimestre 2018, la part des prêts intergouvernementaux dans le PIB s’est établie à 2,0% dans la zone euro et à 1,5% dans l’UE28. Un communiqué de presse Eurostat est à votre disposition en ligne. (Pour plus d’informations: Annika Breidthardt – Tél.: +32 229 56153; Annikky Lamp – Tel.: +32 229 56151)
 
Eurostat : Déficit public désaisonnalisé de la zone euro en hausse à 0,5% du PIB, en hausse à 0,6% du PIB dans l’UE28 (Troisième trimestre 2018)
Au troisième trimestre 2018, le ratio du déficit public par rapport au PIB, corrigé des variations saisonnières, s’est établi à 0,5% dans la zone euro (ZE19), en hausse par rapport au deuxième trimestre 2018 où il se situait à 0,3%. Dans l’UE28, le ratio du déficit public par rapport au PIB s’est établi à 0,6%, contre 0,4% au trimestre précédent. Un communiqué de presse Eurostat est à votre disposition en ligne. (Pour plus d’informations: Annika Breidthardt – Tél.: +32 229 56153; Annikky Lamp – Tel.: +32 229 56151)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The European Commission at the Davos World Economic Forum
The European Commission will participate in the 2019 edition of the World Economic Forum (WEF), which takes place in Davos between the 22 and 25 January. Six Members of the College will participate at this year’s WEF: Vice-President Katainen and Commissioners Oettinger, Hahn, Malmström, Moscovici and Moedas. The main theme of this year’s meeting is “Globalisation 4.0: Shaping a global architecture in the age of the fourth industrial revolution”. The Members of the College participating in this year’s WEF will represent the European Commission in panel debates, sessions as well as bilateral meetings to relay how the Commission is working to turn the EU into a stronger, more competitive and more innovative global actor at the centre of a multilateral rules-based international order. Panels in which the Members of the College will speak will be broadcast on EbS+. For more details, see this week’s Commission calendar and the website of the World Economic Forum. (For more information: Natasha Bertaud – Tel.: +32 229 67456)

Upcoming events of the European Commission (ex-Top News)

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EU increases its humanitarian assistance – record budget adopted for 2019

Source: European Union

From long-lasting conflicts in the Middle East and Africa, to the growing impact of climate change worldwide, humanitarian crises are worsening and conflict threatens aid delivery to those most in need.
“With this new budget, the EU remains a leading humanitarian donor in the face of crises such as Syria and Yemen. Humanitarian aid alone cannot solve all problems but we must do everything in our power to help the most vulnerable. This is our humanitarian duty. We must also think about the impact of these many crises on children, on the next generation. That’s why a record 10% of the new budget, 10 times more than in 2015, is dedicated to education in emergencies, so we can give children the tools to build a better future,” said Christos Stylianides, Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management.
The biggest bulk of the budget will address the crisis in Syria, refugees in neighbouring countries and the extremely critical situation in Yemen. In Africa, EU aid will support people in regions affected by crisis in South Sudan, Central African Republic, Lake Chad basin, the Democratic republic of Congo suffering from an Ebola outbreak and in regions suffering food and nutrition crises, such as Sahel.
In Latin America, EU funding will help the most vulnerable populations affected by the crisis in Venezuela and protracted conflict in Colombia. The European Union will also continue to provide assistance in Afghanistan and help Rohingya populations in both Myanmar and Bangladesh. In Europe, the EU’s humanitarian efforts will focus on people affected by the conflict in Ukraine.
In view of the growing effects of climate change, the funding will help vulnerable communities in disaster prone countries to prepare better to various climatic shocks, such as droughts, floods and cyclones.
Background*
EU humanitarian aid is impartial and independent, and is based only on needs, delivered in accordance with humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence. The EU’s humanitarian assistance helps millions of people in need across the world. EU assistance is implemented via humanitarian partner organisations, including UN agencies, non-governmental organisations and the Red Cross family, who have signed partnership agreements with the European Commission. The Commission closely monitors the use of EU funds via its global network of humanitarian experts and has strict rules in place to ensure funding is well spent.

* Updated on 16/01/2019 at 18:20

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EU to help boost exports of generic pharmaceuticals

Source: European Union

. EU ambassadors meeting today in Coreper agreed on the Council’s position on a draft regulation which introduces an exception for manufacturing for export purposes (manufacturing waiver) to the protection granted to an original medicine by a supplementary protection certificate (SPC).
Thanks to the waiver, EU-based makers of generics and biosimilars will be entitled to manufacture a generic or biosimilar version of an SPC-protected medicine during the term of the SPC if done exclusively for the purpose of exporting to a non-EU market where protection has expired or never existed.
The draft regulation is expected to remove the competitive disadvantages faced by EU-based manufacturers of generics and biosimilars vis-à-vis manufacturers established outside the EU in global markets, but also in day-1 EU markets by building up production capacity.
The exception will operate only where :
generics or biosimilars are produced exclusively for export to third countries where protection of the original medicine does not exist or has expired;
the maker has provided the information required by the regulation to both the authorities of the member state of production and to the holder of the SPC at least three months in advance;
the maker has duly informed all those involved in the commercialisation of the product covered by the exception that the product can be put on the market only outside the EU;
the maker has affixed to the packaging of the product the specific logo provided for by the regulation indicating clearly that it is only for export.
Until a set date (three years from the entry into force of the regulation), the regulation will affect only SPCs that are applied for on or after the date of entry into force of the regulation. From then on , the regulation will also affect SPCs applied for before the entry into force of the regulation, but which have become effective after the entry into force of the regulation.
Next steps
Once the European Parliament agrees on a negotiating mandate, the Romanian presidency will start negotiations with the European Parliament with the aim of adopting the regulation at first reading.
Background
The EU harmonised SPC system was introduced in 1992. It sought to compensate for the loss of effective patent protection due to the time required in order to obtain marketing authorisation (including research and clinical trials).
Global demand for medicines has increased massively (reaching €1.1 trillion in 2017). Alongside this, there is a shift towards an ever-greater market share for generics and biosimilars. Assuming an annual growth rate of 6.9%, by 2020 generics and biosimilars will represent 80% of all medicines by volume, and about 28% by value.
With the expiry of industrial property protection, over €90 billion of the first generation of blockbuster biologics will become open to biosimilar competition by 2020.
The draft regulation should contribute to Europe’s competitiveness as a hub for pharmaceutical R&D and manufacturing. It will help new pharmaceutical companies start up and scale up in high growth areas, and is projected to generate, over the next 10 years, additional net annual export sales of well in excess of EUR 1 billion, which could translate into 20 000 to 25 000 new jobs over that period.
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EU imposes safeguard measures on rice from Cambodia and Myanmar

Source: European Union

The European Commission has therefore decided today to re-introduce import duties that will be steadily reduced over a period of three years.
According to the Commission’s decision, to be published in tomorrow’s Official Journal, as of 18 January the European Union will reinstate the normal customs duty on this product of €175 per tonne in year one, progressively reducing it to €150 per tonne in year two, and €125 per tonne in year three.
During the investigation launched in March 2018, the Commission found that imports of Indica rice from both countries combined have increased by 89% in the past five rice-growing seasons. At the same time, the investigation found that the prices were substantially lower than those on the EU market and had actually decreased over the same period. This surge in low-price imports has caused serious difficulties for EU rice producers to the extent that their market share in the EU dropped substantially from 61% to 29%.
Cambodia and Myanmar are beneficiaries of the EU’s Everything But Arms (EBA) trade scheme, which unilaterally grants duty-and quota-free access to the world’s least developed countries (apart from arms and ammunition). This is one pillar of the EU’s Generalised Scheme of Preferences (GSP) tariff-reduction scheme for developing countries. Today’s action is being taken using the safeguards mechanism of the GSP Regulation.
Background
The initial request for trade safeguards on rice imports was tabled by the Italian government in February 2018 and supported by all other EU rice growing Member States (Spain, France, Portugal, Greece, Hungary, Romania and Bulgaria). The Commission opened a formal investigation on 16 March 2018. The measures will be in place for three years.
The decision will be published in the EU’s Official Journal on 17 January and will enter into force the following day.
For More Information
EU trade relation with Cambodia
EU trade relations with Myanmar
Generalised scheme of preferences

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Commission welcomes European Parliament’s position on InvestEU

Source: European Union

The vote marks an important step towards the creation of the programme, which will bring together under one roof the EU’s financial instruments for investment in the European Union and should trigger at least €650 billion of investment. The Commission now calls on Member States to swiftly agree their position to be able to start the discussions between the three institutions.
Vice-President Jyrki Katainen, responsible for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness, said: “Europe needs more investments to boost jobs, innovation and skills. With InvestEU we are taking the game-changing model of the Investment Plan one step further, expanding it to the whole range of EU funding programmes, making financing easier to access and placing a greater focus on climate action, social inclusion and cohesion. After the Parliament’s vote it is important to keep up the momentum. Member States should follow suit quickly.”
The Commission’s proposal for InvestEU builds on the success of the Investment Plan for Europe – the Juncker Plan ¬ which has already mobilised over €371 billion of investments since its launch. By providing an €38 billion EU budget guarantee to support investment, the InvestEU Fund will crowd in public and private resources to boost investment across the EU in the 2021-2027 budget period.
The InvestEU Fund is policy-driven and will support four main areas: sustainable infrastructure; research, innovation and digitisation; small and medium businesses; and social investment and skills. .
Creating jobs, boosting investment and achieving sustainable economic growth has been President Jean-Claude Juncker’s number one priority since the Commission took office in November 2014. InvestEU will bring together under one roof and with a single brand all EU financial instruments currently available to support investment. This will make EU funding for investment projects simpler to access and more efficient.
Besides the InvestEU Fund, the programme will also consist of the InvestEU Advisory Hub and of the InvestEU Portal, to continue providing tailored support to project promoters as well as an easily accessible pipeline of mature projects for potential investors.
For more information
Press release: InvestEU Programme to support jobs, growth and innovation in Europe
Memo: InvestEU Programme – questions and answers
InvestEU policy package
Factsheet: What is InvestEU?
Factsheet: InvestEU – what will it finance?
Proposal for a Regulation establishing the InvestEU Programme
EU budget for the future
Follow Vice-President Katainen on Twitter: @jyrkikatainen
Follow InvestEU on Twitter: #InvestEU

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CO2 emission standards for cars and vans: Council confirms agreement on stricter limits

Source: European Union

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The EU agreed stricter rules for CO2 emissions of cars and vansInfographic – Cutting CO2 road transport emissions
See full infographic
The EU is taking steps to reduce CO2 emissions of cars and vans. Under the revised rules, there will be stricter CO2 emission standards for new passenger cars and light commercial vehicles. A provisional agreement reached by the Presidency and Parliament representatives on 17 December was endorsed by member states today.
The new rules will ensure that from 2030 onwards new cars will emit on average 37.5% less CO2 and new vans will emit on average 31% less CO2 compared to 2021 levels. Between 2025 and 2029, both cars and vans will be required to emit 15% less CO2.

Today’s agreement gives the go-ahead to decarbonize and modernize Europe’s road transport. It represents an integrated approach to the transition towards low emission mobility, and supports the long-term competitiveness of the sector, including by facilitating innovation in clean technologies, such as batteries and recharging infrastructure. It makes sure that cars will emit on average 37.5% less CO2 in 2030 compared to the current emission standard limits and is therefore an important step to achieve our climate goals. In addition, we are improving the test procedures with stricter rules to ensure a reliable representation of the real world emissions.
Graţiela Leocadia Gavrilescu, Romanian Vice Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment
The specific elements of the agreement
Average CO2 emissions of new cars registered in the EU will have to be 15% lower in 2025 and 37.5% lower in 2030, compared to the emission limits valid in 2021. The CO2 emissions of new vans will need to be 15% lower in 2025 and 31% lower in 2030. These are EU wide fleet targets. The CO2 reduction effort will be distributed among manufacturers on the basis of the average mass of their vehicle fleet.
A review clause provides for a possible revision of the 2030 targets and for the introduction of binding reduction targets for 2035 and 2040 onwards.
The Parliament and the Council agreed on a mechanism to encourage the sale of more zero- and low-emission vehicles such as fully electric cars or plug-in hybrid vehicles based on the approach proposed by the Commission in its original proposal. If a manufacturer meets certain benchmarks, it will be rewarded with less strict CO2 targets. The benchmark levels for 2025 will be 15% for cars and vans, and for 2030 35% for cars and 30 % for vans.
The two specific incentives for zero-and low-emission passenger cars agreed in the Council general approach were maintained with some adjustments:
as concerns the better weighting of low-emission vehicles a factor of 0.7 was agreed;
as concerns the incentive for manufacturers to sell zero- and low-emission cars in markets with a low market penetration of these vehicles, a multiplier of 1.85 was agreed. The eligibility criteria of a market share of zero and low-emission cars below 60% of the EU average was maintained but with a base year of 2017. A second eligibility criteria was introduced, namely a threshold of maximum 1000 newly registered vehicles in 2017 in the member state concerned. Finally, a cap of 5% will apply for the use of the scheme, so that if the share of zero- and low-emission vehicles in a member state exceeds 5% of newly registered cars, the incentive will no longer apply to sales into that member state.
For vans, the Parliament and Council agreed to leave the Commission proposal unchanged in respect to incentives for zero- and low-emission vehicles.
The niche derogation from the targets for those vehicle manufacturers which sell relatively few vehicles in Europe will be continued until 2028.
The effects of the transition of the automotive sector on in particular employment will be addressed via a provision on a socially fair and just transition. The Commission is to consider the possibility of allocating revenue from the excess premiums to a dedicated fund or relevant programmes aimed at ensuring a just transition and if appropriate submit a legislative proposal by 2027.
The Parliament and the Council have agreed on new rules that aim to ensure the robustness and representativeness of emissions data reported.
Firstly, stricter rules have been agreed for the transition from the old NEDC test procedure to the more accurate WLTP test procedure as the basis for calculating the specific emission targets for manufacturers.
Secondly, there will be an increased focus on monitoring “real-drive emissions”. The Commission will monitor the real world representativeness of the CO2 emission values based on data from the fuel consumption meters installed in new cars and vans. In order to prevent an increase in the emissions gap, the Commission is to assess the feasibility of developing a mechanism for the adjustment of the manufacturers’ specific targets as of 2030 and if appropriate submit a legislative proposal to this effect. The Commission must also as part of the review in 2023 assess the feasibility of developing real-world emission test procedures.
Thirdly, there are also specific provisions on in-service conformity testing and on detecting strategies which may artificially improve the CO2 performance of cars and vans.
In addition, the Commission will evaluate the possibility of developing a common EU methodology for the assessment and reporting of lifecycle emissions (life-cycle analysis) of vehicles and, where appropriate, prepare follow-up measures including legislative proposals.
The Commission will review the existing European Directive on car labelling by 2020 in order to improve information to consumers, including evaluating options for introducing a fuel economy and CO2 emission label for vans.
Background and next steps 
The Commission presented the proposal for a new regulation in November 2017 as part of the third clean mobility package. The European Parliament adopted its position on 3 October. The Council agreed its position (general approach) on 9 October.
Negotiations with the European Parliament started on 10 October and ended in a provisional agreement on 17 December, which was confirmed by EU ambassadors of the member states today.
On the European Parliament’s side, the ENVI Committee is scheduled to endorse the provisional agreement on 21 January. The formal adoption of the new rules will happen before the summer.
The overall aim of the proposal is to contribute to achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement and to reach the EU wide 30% reduction target by 2030 compared to 2005 of the non ETS (Emissions Trading System) sector set by the European Commission, which is translated into national targets in the Effort Sharing Regulation.
The proposed measures and targets are based on the 2030 climate and energy framework and the energy union strategy, which aims at a reduction in transport emissions and energy consumption. The reduced need for fossil fuels will also improve the security of energy supply in the EU and reduce our dependence on energy imports from third countries.
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