Das notwendige Minimum zur Existenz- und Teilhabesicherung endlich seriös bestimmen

MIL OSI – Source: Die Linke – Press Release/Statement

Headline: Das notwendige Minimum zur Existenz- und Teilhabesicherung endlich seriös bestimmen

Zur heutigen Kritik der Diakonie an der Ermittlung des soziokulturellen Existenzminimums durch die Bundesregierung und zur heutigen öffentlichen Anhörung zur Regelbedarfsermittlung im Ausschuss für Arbeit und Soziales im Bundestag erklärt Katja Kipping, Vorsitzende der Partei DIE LINKE und sozialpolitische Sprecherin der Fraktion DIE LINKE:
„560 Euro Regelbedarf, zusätzliche notwendige Einzelleistungen und ausreichende Kosten der Unterkunft und Heizung sind die Forderung der Diakonie, die sich aus einer Studie zum soziokulturellen Existenzminimum ergeben. Die 409 Euro Regelbedarf, die uns Andrea Nahles als soziokulturelles Existenzminimum weismachen will, bezeichnen den unseriösen Umgang der Ministerin mit dem Grundrecht auf soziale Sicherheit. Wir schließen uns der Forderung des Deutschen Gewerkschaftsbundes angesichts dieser Situation an: Frau Nahles, ziehen Sie ihr ‚Regelbedarfsermittlungsgesetz‘ zurück. Das notwendige Minimum zur Existenz- und Teilhabesicherung muss endlich seriös bestimmt werden.
DIE LINKE streitet für eine armutsfeste, individuelle und sanktionsfreie Mindestsicherung in Höhe von 1.050 Euro.“

State aid: Commission clears Czech support scheme for renewable energy

MIL OSI – Source: European Union – Press Release/Statement

Headline: State aid: Commission clears Czech support scheme for renewable energy

In December 2014, the Czech Republic notified to the Commission a support scheme in favour of all types of installations generating energy from renewable sources built in the period 1 January 2006 – 31 December 2012. The scheme will have a total budget of CZK 836.5 billion over its lifetime (around €30.95 billion).
The applicable 2001 and 2008 Commission environmental guidelines allow Member States to support energy generation from renewable sources under certain conditions. The Commission found that, in line with the Guidelines, the support takes the form of a preferential prices (feed-in tariffs) and premiums on top of the market price (green bonuses). The measure also incorporates a review mechanism which ensures that installations are not overcompensated and aid is limited to the minimum necessary to achieve the scheme’s objectives.
The support scheme is financed by a combination of a surcharge levied on electricity consumers and contributions from the State budget. In order to remedy any past discrimination against foreign green electricity stemming from the financing of the support scheme, the Czech Republic has committed to investing around €20 million in interconnection projects. The amount reflects the total surcharge levied on the estimated imports of green electricity in the Czech Republic in the period 2006 – 2015. These concerns were removed as of 2016, when the Czech Republic modified the financing system to ensure there was no discrimination of imported green electricity going forward.
The Commission concluded that, in line with EU objectives, the measure helps the Czech Republic to achieve its 2020 renewable energy targets. The review mechanism and interconnector investments ensure that potential distortions of competition brought about by the public financing are limited.

Background
Under the Renewable Energy Directive, the Czech Republic has a renewables target of 14% of gross electricity consumed in the Czech Republic by 2020. The scheme introduced by the Czech Republic in 2006 was aimed at reaching this target.
Member States are obliged to notify state aid measures to the Commission for approval ahead of implementation. Only after a Commission’s approval decision investors can rely on the compliance of a measure with EU state aid rules. The Czech Republic decided to notify the measure in 2014 in order to give investors legal certainty. The Commission has now assessed and approved the measure under its 2001 and 2008 Commission environmental guidelines, which were applicable at the time when aid was being granted under the measure.
The non-confidential version of the decision will be made available under the case number SA.40171 in the State Aid Register on the DG Competition website once any confidentiality issues have been resolved. New publications of state aid decisions on the internet and in the Official Journal are listed in the State Aid Weekly e-News.

Creating a Stronger Financial System: New EU rules for the recovery and resolution of Central Counterparties

MIL OSI – Source: European Union – Press Release/Statement

Headline: Creating a Stronger Financial System: New EU rules for the recovery and resolution of Central Counterparties

A CCP acts as the intermediary to both sides of a transaction in a financial instrument, including bonds, equities, derivatives andcommodities (such as agricultural products, oil and natural gas). They are critical in helping to reduce risks and interconnections through the financial system. They help financial firms and end users such as corporates manage their business risks. The scale and importance of CCPs in Europe and globally has nearly doubled since the post-crisis G20 commitment to clear standardised over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives through CCPs. A large proportion of the EUR 500 trillion of derivatives contracts that are outstanding globally are cleared by 17 CCPs across Europe.
There are already high regulatory standards in place for EU CCPs, set out in the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (“EMIR”, see MEMO/12/232). However, no EU wide rules are in place for the unlikely scenario where CCPs face severe distress or failure and therefore need to be recovered or resolved in an orderly manner. Today’s proposal aims to put into place a recovery and resolution framework to CCPs which are systemically important for the financial system. This will ensure that the critical functions of CCPs are preserved while maintaining financial stability and helping to avoid the costs associated with the restructuring and the resolution of failing CCPs from falling on taxpayers.
Vice-President Valdis Dombrovskis, responsible for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union, said: “This proposal will strengthen Europe’s financial system further and aims at protecting taxpayers by ensuring we can deal with a Central Counterparty if it falls into difficulty. That’s important because Central Counterparties are a critical part our financial system, helping businesses manage their risks. It will complement the stronger regulation of derivatives markets that we put in place after the crisis”.
Vice-President Jyrki Katainen, responsible for Jobs, Growth, Investment and Competitiveness, said: “Central Counterparties work across borders and are critical in helping to reduce risks throughout the financial system. Nevertheless, we must be prepared for the event – however low the probability – of a failure of a CCP and have the necessary rules in place. Today’s proposal is important in securing confidence in our financial system.”
The financial crisis clearly illustrated that the failure of an important financial institution can cause critical problems for the rest of the financial system and can negatively impact growth across the wider economy. It is important that authorities in Europe have the powers to step in were a CCP to fail, and deal with it in an orderly manner.
Key elements of the proposal
The proposed rules for CCPs set out provisions comparable to those in the recovery and resolution rules for banks (Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive– BRRD) and are based on international standards. However, as CCPs are very different businesses to banks, this proposal contains CCP-specific tools that better align with CCPs’ default management procedures and operating rules, especially to determine how losses would be shared.
The proposed rules require CCPs and authorities to prepare for problems occurring, intervene early to avert a problem, and step in when things have gone wrong.
Preparation and prevention
The proposed rules require CCPs to draw up recovery plans which would include measures to overcome any form of financial distress which would exceed their default management resources and other requirements under EMIR. This should include scenarios involving defaults by clearing members of the CCP as well as the materialisation of other risks and losses for the CCP itself, such as fraud or cyberattacks. Recovery plans are to be reviewed by the CCP’s supervisor.
Authorities responsible for resolving CCPs (i.e. resolution authorities) are required to prepare resolution plans for how CCPs would be restructured and their critical functions maintained in the unlikely event of their failure.
Early intervention
Early intervention will ensure that financial difficulties are addressed as soon as they arise and problems can be averted. CCP supervisors are granted specific powers to intervene in the operations of CCPs where their viability is at risk but before they reach the point of failure or where their actions may be detrimental to overall financial stability. Supervisors could also require the CCP to undertake specific actions in its recovery plan or to make changes to its business strategy or legal or operational structure.
Resolution powers and tools
In line with the guidance of the Financial Stability Board, a CCP will be placed in resolution when it is failing or likely to fail, when no private sector alternative can avert failure, and when its failure would jeopardise the public interest and financial stability. In addition, it could be placed into resolution where the use of further recovery measures could compromise financial stability even when the conditions above are not met.
Cooperation between national authorities
CCPs are cross border in nature, with the biggest CCPs operating internationally. It is important that authorities cooperate across borders to ensure effective planning and orderly resolution if needed. The proposal establishes so-called resolution colleges for each CCP containing all the relevant authorities including the European Securities and Markets Authority (ESMA) and the European banking Authority (EBA).
The existing colleges under EMIR and the newly set-up resolution colleges should jointly undertake the specific tasks allocated to them under this Regulation. ESMA will facilitate joint actions and act as a binding mediator if necessary.
The draft Regulation will now be submitted to the European Parliament and the Council of the EU for their approval and adoption.
Background
A public consultation on a possible recovery and resolution framework for non-bank institutions was carried out by the European Commission between 5 October and 28 December 2012. It inquired about the need for recovery and resolution arrangements mainly in relation to CCPs, central securities depositories and insurance undertakings. On the whole, the consultation indicated that the priority should be to develop EU-wide recovery and resolution rules for CCPs. The implementation of the G20 requirement for standardised OTC derivatives to be centrally cleared was recognised as a compelling argument in favour of taking action.
At the international level, G20 leaders have endorsed the approach developed by the Financial Stability Board (FSB) to address the risks which the failure of any financial institution (bank, financial market infrastructure, insurance undertaking, etc.) of global systemic relevance could have on the financial system via comprehensive and appropriate recovery and resolution tools. Furthermore, the Committee on Payment and Market Infrastructures (CPMI) and the International Organisation of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) have developed guidance on recovery plans for financial-market infrastructures, including CCPs, while the FSB has issued further guidance on the application of its Key Attributes of Effective Resolution Regimes to financial market infrastructures such as CCPs. This guidance has been reflected in the Commission’s proposal.
Wider work on resolution
The analysis for the need to respond to the possible recovery and resolution of other financial firms than banks and CCPs is still underway. This is mainly due to the lessons learned during the financial crisis which did not demonstrate an equally urgent need for such measures. However such measures may be necessary in the future, taking account of the development of economic and financial risk in the sectors concerned.
Wider international work on insurance undertakings at G20-level is in its relatively early stages. Within Europe, the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) has engaged in a thorough, comparative and wide-ranging review of national recovery and resolution practices and developments in this area and is set to present a report on this topic in the first half of 2017. On the basis of that report, the Commission will consider the appropriate way forward, in close consultation with the European Parliament, Council and all relevant stakeholders.
Key Data
In 2015, on average more than 50% of the USD 493 trillion global market in OTC derivatives was centrally cleared by CCPs.This almost doubles the percentage from when the G20 commitment was made in 2009. On average, 70% of all new OTC derivatives transactions could now be cleared.
For more information
See our Q&A
More information on CCPs

Central Counterparties Recovery and Resolution Proposal: Frequently Asked Questions

MIL OSI – Source: European Union – Press Release/Statement

Headline: Central Counterparties Recovery and Resolution Proposal: Frequently Asked Questions

A central counterparty (CCP) is a financial market infrastructure that links the two parties to a transaction, becoming the buyer to every seller and the seller to every buyer. A CCP’s main purpose is to manage the risk of one counterparty defaulting (i.e. not being able to make the required payments when they are due), in doing so, this reduces overall risk in the system. CCPs are, therefore, interconnected with all financial institutions that are active on the markets they clear.
What do CCPs clear and how big are they?
CCPs clear a range of financial instruments including bonds, equities, derivatives and commodities (such as agricultural products, oil and natural gas). They help financial firms and non-financial end users such as corporates to manage their risks better. This makes them an important part of the financial system, as they manage significant amounts of counterparty risk and link multiple banks, other financial counterparties and corporates.
In the EU, there are currently 17 CCPs that clear a significant proportion of the EUR 500 trillion of derivatives outstanding. The scale and importance of CCPs will further increase following the implementation of the G20 commitment to clear standardised over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives through CCPs – this commitment was a key post-crisis measure to make financial markets safer. In 2015, on average more than 50% of the OTC derivatives market was centrally cleared by CCPs across all types of derivative contracts – almost double the percentage from when the G20 commitment was made in 2009. On average, 70% of all new OTC derivatives transactions can now be cleared.
Therefore it is important to ensure there is a framework in place should a CCP get into difficulties.
Why is the Commission proposing a framework for CCP recovery and resolution?
The past financial crisis clearly illustrated that the failure of an important financial institution which is highly interconnected with others in financial markets can cause problems for the rest of the financial system and negatively impact growth across the wider economy.
The proposal adopted today by the Commission for EU-wide rules for CCP recovery and resolution will help to address this. It ensures that CCPs and authorities in Europe have the means to act decisively in a crisis situation. An effective resolution regime will also reduce moral hazard as it will incentivise less risky behaviour by CCPs and market participants.
The main objectives of the proposal are:

To ensure that CCPs’ critical functions (i.e. those functions and services that are necessary for the financial markets to work) are preserved while maintaining financial stability,

To help to prevent taxpayers from bearing the costs associated with the restructuring and the resolution of failing CCPs and

To avoid any unnecessary destruction of value (i.e. higher losses or costs associated to the resolution actions that would otherwise be required to meet the resolution objectives).

This proposal builds on the same principles as the Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive (BRRD). It also strengthens the EU’s crisis management framework (comprising both BRRD and the Single Resolution Mechanism Regulation) and complements other legislative initiatives designed to make the financial system safer, in particular the risk reduction measures that have been adopted on the 23rd of November.
Why now?
CCPs in the EU are well regulated under the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) and they have a number of defences to avoid and absorb losses, which means the risk of failure is relatively low. However, as CCPs are becoming increasingly important in clearing OTC derivatives markets, it is important to ensure there is a framework in place to deal with a CCP should things go wrong.
At present, there are no harmonised EU rules for the unlikely situations in which CCPs would face severe distress or fail.
How does the proposal relate to work undertaken at international level?
The Commission’s initiative is aligned with the existing international guidance on recovery and resolution (see below) and is consistent with international developments in this area.
At the international level, G20 leaders have endorsed an approach developed by the Financial Stability Board (FSB) to address the possible risks posed by the failure of any financial institution (such as banks, financial market infrastructures and insurance undertakings) of global systemic relevance on the financial system. This would be done by using comprehensive and appropriate recovery and resolution tools.
Furthermore, the Committee on Payment and Market Infrastructures (CPMI) and the International Organisation of Securities Commissions (IOSCO) have developed guidance on recovery plans for financial-market infrastructures (see here)  including CCPs, while the FSB has issued further guidance on the application of its Key Attributes of Effective Resolution Regimes to financial market infrastructures such as CCPs (see here)
What are the key elements of the proposal?
The proposal lays out a comprehensive set of measures which aim to ensure that:

National resolution authorities are designated in each Member State. These could be national central banks, ministries or the existing supervisory authorities.

National supervisory authorities, as designated under EMIR, are given the tools and powers to intervene in a CCP that is infringing or likely to infringe its prudential requirements and at a sufficiently early stage to address developing problems in a CCP’s financial situation;

CCPs and national supervisory and resolution authorities are adequately prepared for any crisis;

National resolution authorities have harmonised resolution tools and powers to take rapid and effective action when a CCP failure cannot be avoided;

National resolution authorities cooperate effectively, including with third country competent authorities.

The framework takes into account the global and systemic nature of CCPs. It provides for close coordination between national competent authorities in order to ensure that resolution actions are applied in a coherent manner taking into consideration the impact on affected stakeholders and financial stability. 
The key elements of the proposal are:

The framework will be based first on prevention and preparation. CCPs (subject to the approval of supervisory authorities) and resolution authorities are required to draw up recovery and resolution plans respectively on how to handle any form of financial distress which would exceed a CCP’s existing resources. If resolution authorities identify obstacles to resolvability in the course of the planning process, they can require a CCP to take appropriate measures including changes to its operational or legal structure or to its pre-funded loss-absorbing resources on a case-by-case basis to ensure that it can be resolved with the available tools in a way that does not threaten financial stability and does not involve costs to taxpayers.

Supervisory authorities have the powers to intervene at an early stage (i.e. before the problems become critical and the financial situation deteriorates irreparably) when a CCP is in breach of, or is about to breach, its prudential requirements under EMIR. These powers would complement those in EMIR, constituting specific supervisory options in these circumstances. Amongst others, competent authorities could require the CCP to undertake specific actions in its recovery plan or to make changes to its business strategy or legal or operational structure.

The framework will provide national authorities with resolution tools. While minimising the extent to which the cost of a CCP’s failure is borne by Member States and their taxpayers, these tools should ensure that essential clearing functions and services are preserved without the need to bail out the CCP, and that shareholders bear an appropriate part of the losses.

How will national authorities cooperate?
As CCPs are cross border and in many cases global, cooperation between national competent authorities is essential for the system to work. The proposal requires an appropriate coordination of resolution measures in a cross-border context to protect financial stability in all affected Member States and achieve the most effective outcome for the resolution of a CCP.
Considering the role set by EMIR for colleges of supervisory authorities, as well as the possible impacts which resolution actions can have on clearing members and other stakeholders, CCPs’ resolution authorities are required to set up and chair resolution colleges for each CCP. The resolution college will include all the relevant authorities from across the EU.
What are the main resolution tools?
In the unlikely event that a CCP does fail, authorities are equipped with tools to resolve the CCP and reducing the impact on financial stability. The main resolution tools include:

The sale of business tool whereby the authorities would sell all or part of the failing CCP to another entity;

The bridge CCP tool which consists of identifying essential functions of the CCP and separating them into a new CCP (bridge CCP) which could be eventually sold to another entity. The old CCP with the non-essential functions would then be liquidated under normal insolvency proceedings;

The position allocation tool (i.e. partial or full termination of contracts) which aims at re-matching the book of the CCP;

The loss allocation tools (i.e. haircutting of variation margin and cash calls enacted by the resolution authority) which aim to cover the losses of the CCP, restore its ability to meet its payment obligation, recapitalise the CCP and replenish its pre-funded financial resources;

The write-down and conversion of capital and debt instruments or other unsecured liabilities tool which aims at absorbing losses, recapitalising the CCP or bridge CCP or support the use of the sale of business tool.

The proposed Regulation does not mandate which tools and powers to use in different scenarios but leaves the choice of the most appropriate tool in each situation to the resolution authority; however, where practicable, the resolution authority should act in line with the agreed resolution plan.
Use of the resolution tools is governed by certain safeguards to ensure all parties affected are fairly treated. One of these safeguards is the principle of “no-creditor-worse-off”, according to which no creditor should be worse off in resolution than they would have been in the event the CCP entered into insolvency.
What are the conditions to enter into resolution?
A CCP will become subject to resolution when:

There are no realistic prospects of recovery over an appropriate timeframe,

All other intervention measures (such as the default management procedures foreseen in a CCP operating rules or its recovery measures) have been exhausted or could impede the financial stability of one or more Member States,

Winding up the CCP under normal insolvency proceedings would risk prolonged market uncertainties and financial instability.

Entry into resolution will therefore always occur at a point close to insolvency, though authorities will have a degree of discretion to ensure that they can intervene before it is too late for resolution to meet its objectives.
What will be the role of ESMA?
ESMA will play a coordination role both during the prevention and early intervention stages (in particular in resolution planning), with a view to facilitating the adoption of joint decisions (acting as a binding mediator if necessary). To prepare its decisions under this Regulation, ESMA is required to set up a Resolution Committee composed of CCPs’ resolution authorities designated under the proposed Regulation.
Furthermore, in order to ensure full input of the supervisory and resolution authorities of banks (i.e. the CCPs’ clearing members) in this process, these authorities shall be invited to participate as observers to the ESMA Resolution Committee.
How will the proposed Regulation affect interactions with third countries?
In order to improve the enforceability of an EU authority’s action on clearing members located in third countries, CCPs would be required to ensure that the relevant measures set out in their recovery plans are legally binding across jurisdictions. This means ensuring that recovery options constitute contractual obligations under the law of the country in which the CCP is established, or otherwise demonstrating to the satisfaction of competent and resolution authorities that the plans’ provisions are enforceable, for instance under the law of a third country. This would help resolution authorities enforce any outstanding obligations in these plans in resolution.
Similarly, the proposal enables resolution authorities to require CCPs to amend their contracts and other arrangements, in particular under their operating rules, so to facilitate the effective achievement of resolution actions that would affect assets, contracts, rights, liabilities and instruments of ownership of persons located in or governed by the law of third countries.
Beyond this, authorities should engage in cooperation with third country authorities in order to recognise and enforce their decision in relation to any relevant assets or contracts governed by the law of that country.
In order to facilitate the enforcement of actions by a third-country resolution authority on relevant clearing members, contracts or other assets or liabilities located in the EU, relevant Member State authorities will be in charge of recognising and giving effect to them, or refusing to do so in specific circumstances. Recognition will occur provided the third country resolution measures do not have an adverse effect on the financial stability of the Member State, creditors of the CCP receive the same treatment as other creditors regardless of location, and there would be no material fiscal implications for the Member State.
Furthermore, national competent authorities may conclude framework cooperation arrangements with relevant third country authorities for sharing the necessary information and cooperating in carrying out tasks and exercising powers related to the resolution of CCPs.
When will today’s Regulation take effect?
Once adopted, the proposed Regulation on CCP Recovery and Resolution shall take effect once the Commission proposal amending the BRRD – which has been put forward by the Commission on 23 November (see here) – takes effect. This is the case, as that proposal also extends the scope of application of its Title VIII on penalties to CCPs. This extension ensures that sanctioning powers regarding recovery and resolution of financial institutions are consistent.
What work has been previously done on this by the Commission?
In the EU, a public consultation on a possible recovery and resolution framework for non-bank institutions was carried out by the European Commission between 5 October and 28 December 2012. It inquired about the need for recovery and resolution arrangements mainly in relation to CCPs, central securities depositories and insurance undertakings.
On the whole, the consultation indicated that the priority should be to develop EU-wide recovery and resolution rules for CCPs. The implementation of the G20 requirement for standardised OTC derivatives to be centrally cleared was recognised as a compelling argument in favour of taking action.
What are the next steps?
The proposed Regulation will now be submitted to the European Parliament and the Council of the EU for their approval and adoption.
Key Data
– Outstanding OTC derivatives (31/12/2015): USD 493 trillion.
– Outstanding interest rate OTC derivatives (31/12/2015): USD 384 trillion (78% of the above total outstanding OTC derivatives). This includes swaps, FRAs, options.
– Outstanding credit OTC derivatives (31/12/2015): USD 12 trillion (2,4% of the above total outstanding OTC derivatives).
Source: BIS derivatives statistics and BIS quarterly review December, 2015.
Centrally cleared transactions have almost doubled:
– % interest rate OTC derivatives centrally cleared before clearing obligation = about 36% (end 2009).
– % interest rate OTC derivatives centrally cleared after clearing obligation = about 60% (end 2015).
– % credit OTC derivatives centrally cleared before clearing obligation = about 12% (end 2009).
– % credit OTC derivatives centrally cleared after clearing obligation = about 45 % (end 2015).
Central clearing will increase in the future:
As of June 2015, about USD 90 trillion of interest rate swap (IRS) contracts is centrally cleared, about the half of the IRS market, suggesting scope for a further increase in central clearing.
List of EU CCPs (cf. ESMA Register):
https://www.esma.europa.eu/sites/default/files/library/ccps_authorised_under_emir.pdf

Reducing food waste: the EU's response to a global challenge

MIL OSI – Source: European Union – Press Release/Statement

Headline: Reducing food waste: the EU's response to a global challenge

What is food waste?
Food waste is waste which is generated in the production, distribution and consumption of food. In order to fight food waste we need to understand where we lose food, how much and why. This is why, as part of the Circular Economy Package adopted in 2015, the Commission will elaborate a methodology to measure food waste. This methodology will illustrate, in the light of EU definitions of “food” and “waste”, what material is regarded as food waste and what is not, at each stage of the food supply chain. Consistent measurement of food waste levels in the EU and reporting will allow Member States and actors in the food value chain to compare and monitor food waste levels, and thereby assess the effectiveness of food waste prevention initiatives.
What is the scale of the problem?
Food waste is a significant concern in Europe: it is estimated that around 88 million tonnes of food are wasted annually in the EU – around 20% of all food produced – with related costs valued at 143 billion euros[1]. Food is lost or wasted along the whole food supply chain: on the farm, in processing and manufacture, in shops, in restaurants and canteens, and at home. Food waste puts undue pressure on finite natural resources and the environment. According to the Food and Agriculture Organisation, approximately one-third of all food produced in the world is lost or wasted, requiring cropland area the size of China and generating about 8% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Apart from its significant economic and environmental impacts, food waste also has an important economic and social angle in a world where over 800 million people suffer from hunger – the recovery and redistribution of surplus food should be facilitated so that safe, edible food can reach those who need it the most.
Is the EU already doing something about it? What about national policies?
Since 2012, the Commission has engaged and worked actively with all actors to identify where food waste occurs in the food chain, where barriers to food waste prevention have been encountered and areas where actions are needed at EU level. This has laid the foundation for the elaboration of an integrated action plan to tackle food waste presented as part of the Circular Economy package.
In order to be effective, food waste prevention requires action at all levels (global, EU, national, regional and local) and engagement of all key players in order to build integrated programmes required to implement change throughout the food value chain. At national level, some Member States have developed national food waste prevention programmes which have already delivered concrete results[2]. In 2016, two EU Member States (France[3] and Italy[4]) have also adopted specific legislation to promote and facilitate implementation of food waste prevention action and cooperation between the key players.
In September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Sustainable Development Goals for 2030 including a target to halve per capita food waste at the retail and consumer levels and reduce food losses along production and supply chains. The EU and its Member States are committed to meeting this goal.
What is the Commission proposing to re-launch the EU’s action in this area?
The Commission’s Circular Economy Package has singled out food waste prevention as a priority area for action and calls on Member States to reduce food waste generation in line with Sustainable Development Goals. The new waste legislation proposal requires Member States to reduce food waste at each stage of the food supply chain, monitor food waste levels and report back in order to facilitate exchange between actors on progress made.
The Commission’s action plan to prevent food waste in the EU includes:
developing common EU methodology to measure food waste and defining relevant indicators (implementing act to be put forward following adoption of the Commission’s proposal to revise the Waste Framework Directive);
establishing an EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste, which brings together Member States and all actors of the food chain, to help define the measures needed to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals on food waste and share best practice and results achieved;
taking measures to clarify EU legislation relating to waste, food and feed, and facilitate food donation as well as the valorisation of former foodstuffs and by-products as animal feed without compromising food and feed safety;
examining ways to improve the use of date marking by actors of the food chain and its understanding by consumers, in particular the “best before” label.
What will the Commission do to avoid the discarding of edible food?
The Commission will develop, in co-operation with Member States and stakeholders, EU food donation guidelines to help food donors, food banks and other charity organisations comply with relevant EU legislation (food safety, traceability, food hygiene, labelling etc.), with adoption forecast for end 2017.
The Commission will also elaborate the guidelines on the use of former foodstuffs in feed and has already clearly excluded feed materials from the scope of the waste legislative proposal. This will ensure that former foodstuffs (for instance, broken biscuits or stale bread), which are safe to eat but cannot go into the food chain for marketing reasons, are not considered as “waste” anywhere in the EU and can therefore be utilised as a resource to produce animal feed.
What is the EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste?
The Platform, which first gathers on 29 November 2016, will be the key forum at EU level to help all players identify and implement food waste prevention solutions to achieve the related Sustainable Development Goals. Importantly, the Platform will promote inter-sector cooperation and sharing of best practice and results. The EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste aims to support all actors in rethinking a food value chain where food waste is minimised and value gained from food produced is maximised, thereby facilitating our transition to a circular economy and more sustainable food systems.
For the composition of the Platform, the Commission sought to ensure not only a high level of expertise but also a balanced representation of know-how and areas of interest in the food value chain, taking into account the Platform’s mandate and future areas of work.
In the end, a total of 70 members will be part of the Platform. 33 public entities – EU Member States, EFTA countries, EU bodies (Committee of the Region, European Economic and Social Committee), international organisations (OECD, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and UN Environment Programme (UNEP)) and 37 representatives from the private sector, selected following a public call for applications, will be represented.
The members – appointed for the term of the current Commission (i.e. until 31 November 2019) will meet on a regular basis (two meetings are already planned for 2017).
Exchange and dialogue with organisations not represented in the Platform are also foreseen through consultative networks and tools, meetings and public conferences.
The Commission may also invite additional organisations, on an ad hoc basis, to meetings of the Platform or its sub-groups in order to provide additional expertise in specific subject areas.
The Commission will regularly publish on its website the information on the Platform’s work and aims to webstream meetings of the Platform to expand its outreach.
What about date marking? Is it a good way to tackle the issue?
A Eurobarometer[5] carried out in 2015 reveals that while the majority of consumers (58%) declare that they always look at date marking (i.e. “use by” and “best before” dates found on food labelling) when shopping and preparing meals, less than 1 in 2 understand its meaning. Misinterpretation by consumers of the meaning of date marking is considered to have a significant impact on food waste in the home (15-33%, depending on the study).
In addition, the manner in which date marking is utilised by food business operators and regulatory authorities to manage the food supply chain can also have a significant impact on food waste.
The Commission is therefore examining ways to improve understanding and use of date marking rules by all actors in order to prevent food which is still safe and edible from being thrown away, at each stage of the food supply chain.
The Commission has produced an information leaflet in all EU languages and an infographic to explain the difference between these two dates found on food packaging.
How will the Commission tackle the problem of confusion of ‘date labels’ on food?
In order to help inform its future work on date marking, the Commission has launched an external study to map how date marking is used in the market by food business operators and control authorities. Findings from this research, expected by the end of 2017, will support policy making in relation to date marking and food waste prevention.
Given that food business operators are responsible for establishing date marking, the Commission may also develop in future guidance to support industry and facilitate a more consistent use of dates based on a shared understanding of terminology.
With respect to labelling rules, the Commission is considering possible options to simplify date marking on foodstuffs; for instance, by extending the list of foods which are exempt from the obligation to include a “best before” date in food labelling. Today these include items such as vinegar, sugar, salt, chewing gum, but could include other foods for which removal of date marking would not pose a safety concern.
The Commission may also propose to modify terminology used for date marking on food labelling if there is evidence that alternate wording is better understood and more useful to consumers.
The Commission will discuss these options in depth with Member States and stakeholders, ensuring that any changes proposed contribute to food waste prevention, meet consumer information needs and most importantly, do not put consumer safety at risk.
The Commission will also continue to inform about the meaning of date marking on food products, seeking to complement the initiatives carried out by public authorities and stakeholders at national level. In this context, the EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste will provide an important forum for members to share experience and identify best practices in promoting consumer understanding of date marking.
What can I do as an EU consumer to contribute to less food waste?
We can do simple things each day to save food and save money on our grocery bills. The Commission has published a simple leaflet outlining 10 tips to help consumers fight food waste: What can I do in my daily life to limit food waste?
Examples of consumer campaigns on food waste prevention organised at local, regional, national and global levels can be found on the Commission’s food waste website. These include the UK’s Love Food, Hate Waste campaign, which has contributed to a 15% reduction in household food waste levels between 2007 and 2012, as well as global, multi-stakeholder campaigns such as the Think.Eat.Save campaign put in place by UNEP, FAO and partners as part of the SAVE FOOD initiative.
For more information
http://ec.europa.eu/food/safety/food_waste_en

[1] Estimates of European food waste levels, FUSIONS, March 2016
[2] EU FUSIONS – Country Reports: http://www.eu-fusions.org/index.php/country-reports
[3] LOI n° 2016-138 du 11 février 2016 relative à la lutte contre le gaspillage alimentaire
[4] Legge sugli sprechi alimentari (Legge 19 agosto 2016 n.166).http://www.gazzettaufficiale.it/eli/id/2016/08/30/16G00179/sg
[5] Flash Eurobarometer 425 on food waste and date marking, October 2015

Daily News 28 / 11 / 2016

MIL OSI – Source: European Union – Press Release/Statement

Headline: Daily News 28 / 11 / 2016

Creating a Stronger Financial System: New EU rules for the recovery and resolution of Central Counterparties
The European Commission has today proposed new rules to ensure thatsystemic market infrastructures in the financial system, known as Central Counterparties (CCPs), can be dealt with effectively when things go wrong. A CCP acts as the intermediary to both sides of a transaction in a financial instrument, including bonds, equities, derivatives andcommodities (such as agricultural products, oil and natural gas). They are critical in helping to reduce risks and interconnections through the financial system. They help financial firms and end users such as corporates manage their business risks. The scale and importance of CCPs in Europe and globally has nearly doubled since the post-crisis G20 commitment to clear standardised over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives through CCPs. A large proportion of the EUR 500 trillion of derivatives contracts that are outstanding globally are cleared by 17 CCPs across Europe. There are already high regulatory standards in place for EU CCPs, set out in the European Market Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR). However, no EU wide rules are in place for the unlikely scenario where CCPs face severe distress or failure and therefore need to be recovered or resolved in an orderly manner. Today’s proposal aims to put into place a recovery and resolution framework to CCPs which are systemically important for the financial system. This will ensure that the critical functions of CCPs are preserved while maintaining financial stability and helping to avoid the costs associated with the restructuring and the resolution of failing CCPs from falling on taxpayers. For more information, see our press release, Q&A, factsheet and video. (For more information: Vanessa Mock – Tel.: +32 229 56194; Letizia Lupini – Tel.: +32 229 51958)
 
Plan d’investissement pour l’Europe : 75 million d’euros pour des bâtiments économes en énergie en Finlande
La Banque européenne d’investissement (BEI) a accepté de prêter 75 millions d’euros à VVO pour soutenir la construction de «bâtiments à consommation d’énergie quasi-nulle» (bâtiment ZEB, near zero energy building en anglais) en Finlande. Le prêt sera alloué dans le cadre du Fonds européen pour les investissements stratégiques (FEIS), qui est au cœur du Plan d’investissement pour l’Europe. Le programme d’investissement consistera en la construction de plusieurs nouveaux immeubles résidentiels « ZEB », soit environ 1 800 logements, à Helsinki, Vantaa, Espoo et Tampere. La construction de nouveaux bâtiments à consommation d’énergie quasi-nulle contribuera de manière importante à la réalisation de l’objectif de réduction de la consommation d’énergie et d’émissions de CO2 en Europe. Le Vice-président de la Commission européenne Jyrki Katainen, chargé de l’emploi, de la croissance, de l’investissement et de la compétitivité, a déclaré : «Améliorer l’efficacité énergétique des bâtiments nécessite un soutien financier, le Plan d’investissement pour l’Europe doit jouer un rôle clé. Soutenir le financement de maisons à consommation d’énergie quasi-nulle est une excellente utilisation de la garantie de l’UE et je me réjouis à l’idée de recevoir d’autres projets favorisant la transition vers une économie à faible intensité de carbone». (Pour plus d’information: Annika Breidthardt – Tel.: +32 229 56153; Siobhan Millbright – Tel.: +32 229 57361)
 
€435 million returned to European farmers from the Common Agricultural Policy budget
European farmers eligible for direct payments will receive as from 1 December 2016 an additional €435 million amounting to the unused crisis reserve. Since the 2013 CAP reform, a relevant amount is deducted every year from farmers’ direct payments in order to create a yearly agricultural crisis reserve. It can be mobilised, where the annual budget is not sufficient to finance the needs for market support measures such as public intervention and private storage and exceptional measures in crisis situations. If not used by the end of the year, this reserve goes back to farmers.  The Commission provided since September 2015 over €1 billion extra in financial support to the agriculture sector facing particularly difficult market situations. However, it was decided by the Commission and co-legislators to finance this support without touching the crisis reserve so as not to affect the direct payments received by farmers. The additional measures taken such as the extension of existing market measures and the distribution of national envelopes were financed from existing budgetary availabilities in 2016, while the latest solidarity package from July 2016 for the dairy and other livestock sectors will be funded from the 2017 budget. Speaking today, Commissioner Phil Hogan said: “2016 has been a difficult year for many farmers and a number of market sectors in particular. I am pleased that the Commission has been able to respond with a series of additional measures – without having to trigger this last resort, the agricultural crisis reserve. This means that we have been able to react without reducing EU income support to the farming sector.” Since its introduction within the 2013 reform, the crisis reserve has not been used. The deduction only applies to direct payment amounts above €2000 and did not yet apply in Bulgaria, Croatia and Romania in budget year 2016 because the Direct Payments amounts were still not fully phased in in these Member States. For more information see here. (For more information: Daniel Rosario – Tel.: + 32 229 56185; Axel Fougner – Tel.: +32 229 57276)

Illegal logging: EU and Indonesia issue first ever license for verified legal timber trade
On 28 November, in the margins of the first EU-Indonesia Joint Committee, the first ever license for legal timber products (Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade – FLEGT) will be issued at a ceremony in Brussels, by the High Representative/Vice-President, Federica Mogherini, the Foreign Minister of Indonesia, Retno Marsudi and European Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Karmenu Vella. The first shipment of Indonesian certified woods departed to Europe on 15 November 2016, making Indonesia the very first tropical country reaching timber products licensing under FLEGT. All timber products exported from Indonesia to the EU must be accompanied by a valid licence attesting to their legality. Commissioner Vella said: “Today we celebrate a turning point in the global fight to end illegal logging. By tackling illegality at both the supply and demand sides of the trade we have closed the EU market to illegal timber from one of the world’s biggest producers. The implementation of the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) Voluntary Partnership Agreement will boost confidence in the legality of Indonesian timber exports to the EU. It will contribute to a better protection of Indonesian tropical forests, the third largest in the world”. FLEGT is the EU’s response to the problem of illegal logging.The EU buys 11%, by value, of timber products and paper exported from Indonesia. Indonesia supplies 33% of the EU’s tropical timber imports by value. A press release, a Q&A and a Factsheet on EU-Indonesia relations are available. (For more information: Maja Kocijancic – Tel.: +32 229 86570; Daniel Rosario – Tel.: + 32 229 56185)

State aid: Commission clears Czech support scheme for renewable energy
The European Commission has approved a support scheme for installations producing renewable energy built in the Czech Republic between 2006 and 2012 under EU state aid rules. The Commission found that, in line with the applicable 2001 and 2008 Commission environmental guidelines, the support takes the form of a preferential prices (feed-in tariffs) and premiums on top of the market price (green bonuses). The measure also incorporates a review mechanism which ensures that installations are not overcompensated and aid is limited to the minimum necessary to achieve the scheme’s objectives. The Czech Republic has also committed to investing around €20 million in interconnection projects. The Commission concluded that, in line with EU objectives, the measure helps the Czech Republic to achieve its 2020 renewable energy targets. The review mechanism and interconnector investments ensure that potential distortions of competition brought about by the public financing are limited. The full press release is available online in EN, DE, FR and CS. (For more information: Ricardo Cardoso – Tel.: +32 229 80100; Yizhou Ren – Tel.: +32 229 94889)

State aid: Commission approves the extension of the remit of the IFD, the Portuguese Development Bank
The European Commission has found the extension of the remit of the Portuguese Development Bank Instituição Financeira de Desenvolvimento (IFD) to be in line with EU state aid rules. In October 2014, the Commission approved the creation and capitalisation of IFD, which manages and channels European Structural and Investment Funds (ESIF) allocated to Portugal for the 2014-2020 financing period, as well as reimbursements from ESIF-funded programmes. Today’s decision enables IFD to expand its activities to general support in favour of SMEs, in line with the criteria of the Commission’s General Block Exemption Regulation, which allows public authorities to implement a broad spectrum of SME support activities without having to notify it to the Commission for prior authorisation. IFD may also implement measures approved under the Commission’s Guidelines on state aid for risk financing. Finally, IFD will participate in EU financial instruments, such as the European Fund for Strategic Investments (EFSI), COSME, Horizon 2020 and the SME Initiative. The Commission found that IFD’s activities contribute to financing SMEs that have difficulties in raising finance from the market, in line with EU objectives. The Commission therefore approved the extended remit under Article 107(3)(c) of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, that allows Member States to grant aid to support the development of certain economic activities. The non-confidential version of the decision will be made available under the case number SA.42665 in the State Aid Register on the Commission’s competition website once any confidentiality issues have been resolved. New publications of state aid decisions on the internet and in the Official Journal are listed in the State Aid Weekly e-News. (For more information: Ricardo Cardoso – Tel.: +32 229 80100; Yizhou Ren – Tel.: +32 229 94889)

Mergers: Commission clears acquisition of sole control of Deli Home and Garden by SHV Holdings
The European Commission has approved under the EU Merger Regulation the acquisition of sole control over Deli Home and Garden by SHV Holdings, both of the Netherlands. Deli Home and Garden is a producer and supplier of home and garden building materials throughout Europe. SHV is a holding company with investments in various sectors through its subsidiary NPM Capital. The Commission concluded that the proposed acquisition would raise no competition concerns because there is no overlap between the companies’ activities. Moreover, SHV currently already has joint control over Deli. The operation was examined under the simplified merger review procedure. More information will be available on the Commission’s competition website, in the public case register under the case number M.8249. (For more information: Ricardo Cardoso – Tel.: +32 229 80100; Angela Nardella – Tel.: +32 229 86801)

EUROSTAT: La production agricole totale dans l’UE a reculé de 1,8% en 2015 par rapport à 2014
Les comptes économiques de l’agriculture font apparaître que la valeur totale de la production agricole dans l’Union européenne (UE) s’établissait à 411,2 milliards d’euros aux prix de base en 2015, soit une baisse de 1,8% par rapport à 2014. En 2015, l’équivalent de 60% de la valeur de la production agricole générée ont été consacrés à la consommation intermédiaire (intrants de biens et services), tandis que la valeur ajoutée brute (c’est-à-dire la valeur de la production moins la valeur de la consommation intermédiaire) a atteint 40% (164,6 milliards d’euros). Un communiqué de presse est disponible ici. (For more information: Daniel Rosario – Tel.: + 32 229 56185; Axel Fougner – Tel.: +32 229 57276)
 
ANNOUNCEMENTS
 
12th High-Level Meeting of Religious Leaders
Tomorrow, First Vice-President Frans Timmermans will host the 12th annual high-level meeting with religious leaders from across Europe to discuss “Migration, integration and European values”. Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship Dimitris Avramopoulos and European Parliament Vice-President Antonio Tajani will also take part in the event. This year the participants will focus their discussions on challenges posed by populism and intolerance as well as the vital role of education and grassroots outreach in improving integration and social cohesion in Europe. The meeting will take place within the framework of the ongoing dialogue with religious, philosophical and non-confessional organisations as enshrined in the Lisbon Treaty (Art 17 TFEU). More information on the Article 17 Dialogue is available here. The press conference will take place in the Commission press room at 12:00 and will be live streamed on EBS. (For more information: Alexander Winterstein – Tel.: +32 229 93265; Katarzyna Kolanko – Tel.: +32 229 63444)
 
Food waste: kick-off meeting for EU platform
Tomorrow (29 November), Commissioner Vytenis Andriukaitis, in charge of Health and Food Safety, will address members of the EU Platform on Food Losses and Food Waste (FLW) at its inauguralmeeting. Launched as part of the Circular Economy Package Action Plan, this Platform will spearhead EU efforts to fight food waste from farm to fork. Commissioner Andriukaitis said: “Rethinking our food systems might seem a daunting task, requiring significant efforts but it is our moral obligation that we have to meet with commitment, creativity and co-operation. I am certain that all Platform members share the sense of urgency that tackling food waste so clearly demands”. The Platform brings together both public and private interests in order to foster cooperation amongst all key players in the food value chain and help accelerate the EU’s progress towards the global Sustainable Development Goal of halving food waste by 2030. At this kick-off meeting, participants will discuss operations and share their views on key priorities of the EU platform on FLW, which aims to support all actors in defining measures needed to prevent food waste, sharing best practices and evaluating progress made over time. The meeting will be web-streamed here. A Q&A and agenda are available online. (For more information: Daniel Rosario – Tel.: + 32 229 56185; Aikaterini Apostola – Tel.: +32 229 87624)
 
Upcoming events of the European Commission (ex-Top News)

На заседании Военного совета Черноморского флота подведены итоги завершившегося учебного года

MIL OSI – Source: Russia Federation – Ministry of Defence –

Headline: На заседании Военного совета Черноморского флота подведены итоги завершившегося учебного года

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Подробнее28.11.2016 (13:54)

В Севастополе под руководством командующего Черноморским флотом (ЧФ) адмирала Александра Витко состоялось расширенное заседание Военного совета объединения, на котором подвели итоги деятельности флота в завершающемся учебном году. На мероприятие были приглашены начальники управлений, отделов и служб флота, командиры соединений, воинских частей и их заместители по работе с личным составом.

В ходе заседания были заслушаны доклады об итогах боевой подготовки, дан анализ уровню материально-технического обеспечения флота, состоянию воинской дисциплины в воинских коллективах.

В частности, отмечалось, что корабли и суда ЧФ осуществили около 80 походов в ближнюю и дальнюю морские зоны, успешно отработали в ходе СКШУ «Кавказ-2016», ответственно и профессионально выполняли задачи в составе постоянного оперативного соединения ВМФ России в Средиземном море.

В период дальних походов экипажи новейшего фрегата «Адмирал Григорович» и малых ракетных кораблей «Серпухов» и «Зеленый Дол» впервые выполнили боевую стрельбу крылатыми ракетами «Калибр» по целям террористов на территории Сирийской Арабской Республики.

На флоте велась плановая подготовка группировок разнородных сил, однородных и разнородных тактических групп.

По итогам года одним из лучших кораблей флота по видам боевой подготовки назван гвардейский ракетный крейсер «Москва».

Лучшими кораблями второго, третьего и четвертого рангов стали ракетный корабль на воздушной подушке «Самум», морской тральщик «Иван Голубец» и противодиверсионный катер «Суворовец».

Среди лучших отмечены подразделения морской авиации и береговых войск флота.

Приказом главнокомандующего Военно-Морским Флотом по итогам проведения состязаний на первенство ВМФ переходящие призы присуждены экипажу малого ракетного корабля «Зеленый Дол», корабельной десантной группе бригады десантных кораблей ЧФ, экипажу новейшей дизельной подводной лодки «Ростов-на-Дону», батальонной тактической группе отдельной бригады береговой обороны флота, тактической группе авиационной эскадрильи отдельного морского штурмового авиационного полка, а также экипажу самолёта Ан-26 из состава отдельного смешанного авиационного полка морской авиации ЧФ.

Среди основных задач, которые Черноморскому флоту предстоит решать в 2017 году, были обозначены следующие: обеспечение приёма в боевой состав  новых кораблей и подводных лодок, а также выполнение задач кораблями и судами флота в составе постоянного соединения ВМФ в Средиземном море.
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В Бурятии направлено в суд уголовное дело в отношении руководителя предприятия, обвиняемого в хищении свыше 13 млн рублей

MIL OSI – Source: Russia – Prosecutor Generals Office –

Headline: В Бурятии направлено в суд уголовное дело в отношении руководителя предприятия, обвиняемого в хищении свыше 13 млн рублей

Первым заместителем прокурора республики Бурятия утверждено обвинительное заключение по уголовному делу в отношении председателя Совета директоров ЗАО «Байкалжилстрой» Виктора Абушеева. Он обвиняется в совершении преступления, предусмотренного ч.4 ст. 159 УК РФ (мошенничество в особо крупном размере).

По версии следствия, Абушеев, в период с августа 2014 года по январь 2015 года при осуществлении работ по поставке и монтажу электрооборудования в Иволгинском районе Республики Бурятия похитил бюджетные денежные средства в особо крупном размере на сумму более 13 млн рублей.

Уголовно дело направлено в Советский районный суд города Улан-Удэ для рассмотрения по существу.

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Kneipp-Bund: Neue Strategien für die Prävention

MIL OSI – Source: DOSB – Press Release/Statement

Headline: Kneipp-Bund: Neue Strategien für die Prävention

Kneipp-Bund: Neue Strategien für die Prävention
28.11.2016
Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung müssen noch stärker im Alltag der Bürger ankommen, so da Fazit des Kongresses „Zukunft Prävention – Neue Strategien zur Prävention chronischer Erkrankungen“.

Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer des Kongresses in Berlin. Foto: Kneipp-Bund

Denn Vorsorge kann entscheidend dazu beitragen, dass bei Millionen Menschen chronische Volksleiden wie Herz-Kreislauf-Probleme und Diabetes Typ 2 einen schwächeren Verlauf nehmen. Bestenfalls treten sie erst gar nicht ein. Dieses Fazit haben am vergangenen Mittwoch (23.11.) rund 300 Fachleute aus Politik und Gesundheitswesen auf dem Kongress „Zukunft Prävention – Neue Strategien zur Prävention chronischer Erkrankungen“ gezogen. Die Barmer GEK, der Kneipp-Bund e.V. und der Dachverband Anthroposophische Medizin in Deutschland (DAMiD) führten die Tagung in Berlin durch. Im vergangenen Jahr hat die Koalition das Präventionsgesetz verabschiedet, das unter anderem mehr Vorsorge in Schule, Kita und Betrieb vorsieht. „Das Präventionsgesetz wirkt. Vorsorge ist und bleibt aber eine gesamtgesellschaftliche Aufgabe. In der nächsten Legislaturperiode sollten die Weichen gestellt werden, um weitere Akteure stärker in die finanzielle Verantwortung einzubinden“, sagt Christoph Straub, Vorstandvorsitzender der Barmer GEK.
In diesem Zusammenhang spricht sich Straub für mehr Engagement für gesündere Nahrungsmittel aus. Denn eine ausgewogene Ernährung ist ein zentraler Bestandteil, um Volksleiden vorzubeugen. „Wir müssen mehr denn je nachhaltige Konzepte und Strategien entwickeln, damit gesundes Essen auf den Tisch kommt. Daher ist es wichtig, bereits in der Kita und der Schule beispielsweise weniger salz- und zuckerreiche Ernährung anzubieten“, so Straub.
Kneipp-Bund stärkt praktische Umsetzungsmöglichkeiten der Prävention
„Durch die verbesserten Lebensbedingungen und die demografische Entwicklung hat sich auch das Krankheitspanorama verändert“, betonte Marion Caspers-Merk, Präsidentin des Kneipp-Bundes. So seien circa 80 Prozent der europäischen Krankheitslast durch chronisch-degenerative Erkrankungen verursacht. „Diese Volks- oder Zivilisationskrankheiten sind oft sehr kostenintensiv und belasten unser Gesundheitssystem“, so die ehemalige Staatssekre­tärin des Bundesgesundheitsministeriums. Da viele chronische Erkrankungen durch die Le­bensführung beeinflussbar seien, ließe sich durch mehr Prävention sowohl die Krankheitslast verringern als auch einhergehende Kosten vermeiden. „Mit den Kneippschen Naturheilver­fahren haben wir ein hervorragendes Konzept, das nachhaltig und kostengünstig in sämt­liche Lebens- und Arbeitswelten implementierbar ist“, erklärte Caspers-Merk. Ein Leben nach Kneipp könne den Ausbruch chronischer Erkrankungen, wie beispielsweise Diabetes Typ 2, verhindern, hinauszögern oder den Verlauf abflachen. „Wir müssen die Umsetzung in der Praxis weiter stärken. Dazu gehört vor allem Aufklärungsarbeit, Fachwissen und Infor­ma­tionsweitergabe – unser Kongress soll ein weiterer Schritt in diese Richtung sein“, so die Präsidentin des Kneipp-Bundes.
Die Anthroposophische Medizin fordert, Patienten stärker einzubeziehen
Für den Dachverband Anthroposophische Medizin in Deutschland (DAMiD) liegt in der stärkeren Berücksichtigung der Prävention zugleich die Chance, die Patientinnen und Patienten stärker im Gesundheitswesen einzubinden, so dessen Vorstandsmitglied Stefan Schmidt-Troschke: „Krankheiten, die die Menschen oft lebenslang begleiten, steigen deutlich an. Rund 30 bis 40 Prozent der Deutschen berichten über chronisches Kranksein. Die Prävention vieler dieser Krankheiten ist nur möglich innerhalb der Lebens-, Bildungs- und Arbeitswelten. Einfache Lösungen greifen zu kurz und verschlingen Ressourcen, die dringend gebraucht werden. Wenn wir wirklich vorankommen wollen in der Prävention, so geht es auch um eine Stärkung der zivilgesellschaftlichen Potenziale. Wir müssen Menschen aktiver herausfordern, die Gestaltung ihrer Lebensbedingungen selbst in die Hand zu nehmen, so dass die Betroffenen zu Beteiligten werden.“
(Quelle: Kneipp-Bund)

Behindertensportler 2016 in Köln geehrt

MIL OSI – Source: DOSB – Press Release/Statement

Headline: Behindertensportler 2016 in Köln geehrt

28.11.2016
Die Leichtathleten Vanessa Low (Weitsprung/Sprint), Niko Kappel (Kugelstoßen) und das Team der 4×100-Meter-Staffel sind die Behindertensportler des Jahres 2016.

Die 4×100 Meter Staffel v.l.n.r.: Markus Rehm, David Behre, Trainer Karl-Heinz Düe, Felix Streng, Johannes Floors freuen sich über die Auszeichnung. Niko Kappel war zum ersten Mal bei Paralympischen Spielen dabei. Markus Nitsche (l.) zeichnet im Beisein von DBS-Präsident Friedhelm Julius Beucher (m.) Nachwuchssportler Tom Kierey aus. Fotos: DBS/Ralf Kuckuck

Bei einem Festakt mit 400 geladenen Gästen im Deutschen Sport & Olympia Museum in Köln wurden sie am Samstagabend geehrt.
Die 26-jährige Paralympics-Siegerin im Weitsprung, Vanessa Low, darf sich zum ersten Mal Behindertensportlerin des Jahres nennen. Dies ist jedoch nicht die erste Auszeichnung für Low in diesem Jahr. Sie wurde für ihre herausragenden Leistungen bei den Paralympischen Spielen bereits von der Deutschen Sporthilfe zur Sportlerin des Monats September gekürt.
Nachdem Vanessa Low bei den Paralympics in London 2012 den sechsten Rang im Weitsprung belegt hatte, wechselte sie Trainer und Wohnort und zog für den Sport in die USA nach Oklahoma City. Dort bereitete sie sich mit Trainer Roderick Green auf die Paralympischen Spiele in Rio de Janeiro vor. Das hat sich für die beidseitig oberschenkelamputierte Athletin ausgezahlt, denn Low ließ ihre Dauerkonkurrentin Martina Caironi (Italien) in Rio hinter sich und sprang in ihrer Startklasse T42 sogar mit Weltrekordweite (4,93 Meter) zu paralympischem Gold. Ihre erfolgreichen Spiele 2016 hat sie mit einem hervorragenden zweiten Rang im Sprint über 100 Meter abgerundet.
Auch im Vorfeld der Paralympischen Spiele setzte sich Vanessa Low bei Welt-und Europameisterschaften gegen die Konkurrenz durch und kämpfte sich im Weitsprung ganz nach oben auf das Siegertreppchen.
Für Niko Kappel waren die Spiele 2016 eine Abfolge von Premieren: Seine ersten Paralympischen Spiele, sein erstes paralympisches Gold – das war zugleich die erste paralympische Goldmedaille für die Deutsche Paralympische Mannschaft am Zuckerhut. Der 21-jährige Kleinwüchsige, der in der Klasse F41 startet, bezwang bei  seinem Kugelstoß-Debüt auf paralympischer Bühne souverän auch  seinen Konkurrenten, den Weltrekordhalter und Topfavoriten Bartosz Tyszkowski. Kappel verwies den polnischen Kugelstoßer im fünften Versuch mit einer Weite von 13,57 Meter auf den zweiten Platz und verbesserte seine persönliche Leistung damit um 31 Zentimeter.
In seiner noch jungen Karriere hat der Sindelfinger, der von Peter Salzer trainiert wird, bereits bei  der Weltmeisterschaft  2015 und der Europameisterschaft 2016 mit Silbermedaillen geglänzt. Gekrönt wurde sein rasanter sportlicher Aufstieg durch das Rio-Gold.
Und nun folgt eine weitere Premiere: Niko Kappel ist Behindertensportler des Jahres 2016.
Die 4×100-Meter-Staffel mit David Behre, Johannes Floors (21), Markus Rehm (28) und Felix Streng (21) ist Team des Jahres 2016
Die vier Leverkusener sprinteten erneut an die Spitze. Nachdem das Erfolgs-Quartett bereits bei der Weltmeisterschaft  2015 und der Europameisterschaft 2016 die Goldmedaille gewann, sicherten sie sich in Rio nun auch noch paralympisches Gold. Sie sprinteten mit paralympischem Rekord und neuem Europarekord in 40,82 Sekunden ins Ziel und holten somit in der Startklasse T42-46 das begehrte Gold. Das Team aus den USA mit Jerome Singleton, Jarryd Wallace, Jaquvis Hart und Hunter Woodhall überquerte zwar als erstes mit Weltrekord die Ziellinie, wurde aber aufgrund eines Wechselfehlers von Wallace auf Hart nachträglich disqualifiziert.  Die Freude über den unverhofften Goldregen bei Sportlern und Fans war riesig, so groß, dass sich Johannes Floors beim Jubeln das Knie verdrehte und anschließend mit dem Rollstuhl aus dem Stadion gefahren werden musste. Das jahrelange Wechseltraining beim TSV Bayer 04 Leverkusen der vier Sportler hatte sich ausgezahlt. Die US-Sprinter sind zwar die schnellere Zeit gelaufen, machten aber einen fatalen Wechselfehler, der sie die Goldmedaille kostete. „ Wir waren das bessere Team“ so Markus Rehm. Ein Team, das sich verdient Team des Jahres bei  der Behindertensportlerwahl 2016 nennen darf.
DBS- Nachwuchssportler des Jahres 2016
Der 22-jährige Kanute Tom Kierey kämpft hart für seinen Erfolg. Über 25 Stunden in der Woche trainiert der Berliner, neben seiner Ausbildung zum Groß – und Außenhandelskaufmann. Nun kann der junge Leistungssportler die Früchte seiner Arbeit ernten. Bei der Weltmeisterschaft 2016 auf der Duisburger Regattabahn setzte er sich  gegen die starke Konkurrenz durch und stand ganz oben auf dem Siegertreppchen. Diesen Erfolg verpasste er bei den Paralympics  in Rio de Janeiro um Haaresbreite. Nur 9 Hundertstel  trennten ihn vom Paralympics-Sieger, dem Ukrainer Serhii Yemelianov. Für Tom Kierey „ eine klare Ansage für Tokio“.
Als Honorierung für seine herausragenden Leistungen wird Tom Kierey mit dem DBS-Nachwuchspreis geehrt.
DBS-Ehrenpreis für das IPC-Governing Board
Der diesjährige Ehrenpreis des Deutschen Behindertensportverbands (DBS) geht an das IPC-Governing Board. Der IPC-Vorstand wird vom DBS für seine Null-Toleranz-Politik bei der Dopingbekämpfung ausgezeichnet. Die im Vorfeld der Paralympics in Rio aufgedeckten Dopingpraktiken Russlands stellen im Behindertensport eine neue Dimension dar. Folgerichtig begrüßte der DBS,   die klare, unmissverständliche und mutige Entscheidung des IPC, die russischen Athletinnen und Athleten von den Paralympics 2016 auszuschließen. Friedhelm Julius Beucher: „Es handelte sich hier um ein wichtiges Signal hin zu einem konsequenten Anti-Doping-Kampf – im Sinne des Fair-Play-Gedankens im Sport. Diese harte Linie war der völlig richtige Weg. Im Gegensatz zum IOC hat der Paralympische Sport diese historische Chance wahrgenommen, von der sich der DBS nachhaltige Auswirkungen auf gerechte Wettkämpfe erhofft.“
Spitzenpolitiker, Sportler, Vertreter aus Gesellschaft und Wirtschaft,  Partner und Förderer des Deutschen Behindertensportverbands sowie Medien nahmen an der Ehrung der Behindertensportler des Jahres 2016 teil.
Hintergründe zu den Sportlerinnen und Sportlern unserer Deutschen Paralympischen Mannschaft finden Sie unter www.deutsche-paralympische-mannschaft.de.
(Quelle: Deutscher Behindertensportverband)